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Three things you didn’t know digital modeling and printing could do

By On Nov 30 2016

Three things you didn’t know digital modeling and printing could do

Digital modeling and printing technologies have grown by leaps and bounds in the past few years and our team at ZUM3D have been waiting eagerly to see what the future holds in store for us. While our own industry has certainly gone through a dramatic transformation, it seems as though the most exciting changes are yet to come.

 

Supernovas

One of the most mind-boggling natural phenomena that our universe has to offer, supernovas mark the end of many stars’ natural life-cycle, with a massive explosion that can be seen from millions of light years away. While it might seem outside the realm of possibility to turn something so distant and so powerful into an interactive digital model, physicists are making it happen as we speak. Using computer simulations of the supernova, digital renderings can be created that will allow researchers to learn more about the mechanisms behind our universe’s creation.

 

Motion

Animated models has been a part of ZUM3D’s toolkit for years, allowing us to bring to life many of the renderings we create and allowing our clients to further immerse themselves into the digital world. But one step we haven’t yet taken is translating our full-motion models into real-life 3D-printed sculptures. The people at Autodesk research are now in the process of developing ChronoFab, a digital tool that allows artists to create models that depict natural movement in a variety of ways. Motion lines, stroboscopic stamps, sweeps, and particle systems are all employed to give different effects.

 

In-progress work

Using the same technology of the 3D doodler pen that came out last year, a team led by Huaishu Peng has created a 3D printer that can bring your virtual model to the physical world, while it is still in progress. This allows modelers to create durable wireframe sculptures in as little as 30 seconds, completely bypassing the long processing times of 3D printing process just a few years ago. Physical models can be built up over time, as well as edited and deconstructed, using a digital interface. Enthusiasts are still waiting to hear when this technology will be available to the general public, but for now it’s still in development.

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about the author

Michael Semmen is a founding partner of ZUM3D. His career in the global Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) industry and technology sectors spans over 14 years. Michael holds a Bachelor of Architecture and a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies from Washington State University with studies in Copenhagen, Denmark at the Royal Academy.

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